EXAMPLE BOAT FEATURE - 'JASMIN'
1962 HALVORSEN CRUISER
This classic 32 foot 6 inch Halvorsen was built for leading Sydney Holden dealer W T Coggins in 1962 and has since been enjoyed by several ‘custodians’ with current owners Jeff and Lyn Walton acquiring it in 1996.
A one-off design by Harvey Halvorsen (Jeff has the original drawings), 'Jasmin' has an Oregon hull with double diagonal planking on the bottom and diagonal/horizontal planking for the topsides.  'Jasmin' is featured in my 'Wood On Water' book.
A pair of Volvo 41A diesels has replaced the original Chrysler Ace engines and takes the flybridge cruiser to around 22 knots top speed. Typically though, Jeff and Lyn cruise at a leisurely and economical four to seven knots.
Jeff credits previous owners Max Bowen (who took care of ‘Jasmin’ for 22 years) and Peter Lawson for the excellent condition the boat has today. Jeff mentioned: “Max was a great asset to the boat, he really looked after it. He re-powered it and put the new decks on I believe, and I think he also added the flybridge around 1988. Then it was sold to Peter Lawson who had it for 18 months or so and did some work at fairly great expense. But then he put it on the market and we bought it. Lyn and I have had six Halvos, and this one just suits us perfectly.”
Jeff added: “It’s a very easy boat to handle with one or two people. We can comfortably accommodate six or eight people for a day cruise.. It sleeps two up the front, the 
​​starboard saloon lounge drops down to a night-and-day and there are two berths in the cockpit. Mostly it’s just the two of us and we use the whole boat; in winter we sleep in the saloon because that’s insulated by the flybridge and is quite warm, during the shoulder season we sleep up the front and in summer we sleep out the back.”
“We keep ‘Jasmin’ on a mooring at Cottage Point with the Kuringai Motor Yacht Club and most of our cruising has been on these local Cowan Waters. We’ve done some longer runs; down to Sydney Harbour is about four hours for a comfortable run. We’ve been up to Port Stephens and other good runs include up Mullet Creek, under the Mooney Mooney Bridge, up to Maitland Bay, and Brisbane Waters is always a nice run.”
​​Jeff added: “It’s a very easy boat to handle with one or two people. We can comfortably accommodate six or eight people for a day cruise. It sleeps two up the front, the starboard saloon lounge drops down to a night-and-day and there are two berths in the cockpit. Mostly it’s just the two of us and we use the whole boat; in winter we sleep in the saloon because that’s insulated by the flybridge and is quite warm, during the shoulder season we sleep up the front and in summer we sleep out the back.”
​​​Jeff commented: "People ask how long do these things last and we say well, how do we know? The hull timbers were an inch thick when it was built and they're still an inch thick. The clue is regular usage and regular mainten-
​​ance. A lot of people get frightened off by timber boats, but keep them covered when you’re not using them and just use common sense. I think they’re less work than polishing a fibreglass boat. Sure you’ve got to paint them; I devote one weekend a year to varnish – one day to rub down and one day to put a coat on, that’s all that’s required."
He continued: "For the hull, it needs an antifoul once a year and, well, you have to do that whatever boat you have. I know people leave them longer but if you really want to look after your boat that’s what you do. The hull gets painted every five or six years, and really that’s it. Quite frankly there’s nothing much goes wrong with the motors; an oil and filter change once a year. The anodes get changed probably twice a year, and every few years you adjust the stern and rudder glands."
Jeff had some good advice: " Always run a dry bilge; if there’s water in the bilge you know you’ve got a problem somewhere so you go round and look for it – maybe a leaking hose clamp on fresh water. If its salt water, it’s usually a stern or rudder gland leaking or usually something quite minor so you fix it. Keep your bilge dry and you can more easily track down the problem if water does appear."
​​Asked about electrical systems, Jeff said: "Batteries? Well I have two N200 batteries; I have a little Honda petrol generator that sits in a cupboard out the back, a 40 watt solar panel and a battery charger. If I end up with a flat battery after having too many lights on at night and staying up chatting with everyone, I can use the little generator – pull it out, connect it up, put it on the back deck, give it a kick in the ribs, and in a few minutes there’s enough power in the batteries to start the motors".